5-10 Year
Facilities Plan

Where we have been, where we are, and where we are going

In looking back at the 2014-15 Master Facilities plan, we believed a more visual overview would be helpful to our communities. therefore, we have made this living website that will be updated as needed.

Note: in relation to the original Master Facilities plan, dollars quoted reflect 2014-15 amounts and do not account for the inflation in material and construction costs for the current year or years to come.

This 5-10 year plan also reflects a change in the scope and timing as we have changed from a 5 phase plan to a 3 phase plan. A part of that planning included moving Manteca High School and East Union High School up into phase 2.

As always, the fiscally conservative leadership of the MUSD Board of Trustees and District Leadership are responsible, open, and wise in how they spend public dollars for the betterment of education in MUSD. As work is prioritized, it reflects a concern first for Health and Safety, Major Maintenance, and only then modernization and upgrades.

We strongly believe in meaningful and measureable student-centered targets that are aligned to meet state standards and mandates. Ensuring equity and parity in our schools is one way that we do that. All plans for timing and types of work being done reflect those values and the District Vision and Mission as a whole.

Because of this strong belief in our vision and mission, we present to you the reality of where we are now. The stark truth—that although we have worked hard to plan the years ahead—there simply are not enough funds to provide for all MUSD campuses to have full health, safety, maintenance and modernization.

As a community, we must do more to unite our efforts providing for our children to have safe and maintained places to learn.

As you read the remainder of this report, consider:

  • How do schools impact the community?
  • How are schools connected to the community?

What can new development do to pay their fair share? How can home owners believe in the value of their neighborhood schools? And how can city officials to stand up for what is right in fully funding what schools need?

total need 2014

total need 2014

Phase 1

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 3

Phase Summary

Phase Summary

total need 2014

total need 2014

Phase 1

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 3

Phase Summary

Phase Summary

Phase 1: 2015-2017

Phase 1: 2015-2017

Phase 1: 2015-2017

As you can see from the timeline above, in January of 2015 we began the modernization process for these schools. Although each of them has unique needs, we strive for equity as well.

The Operations Department schedules internal employees to perform much of the ongoing maintenance work using a Routine Restricted Maintenance fund to avoid costs that would be incurred from a third party contractor.

Using this fund, MUSD leadership was able to complete some of the unfunded projects through this phase of modernization.

Lincoln

Lincoln had a needs estimate of $12 million in the Master Facilities Plan. That $12 million was spent from Measure G and another $5.6 million in needed projects were left unfunded.

  1. Health and Safety: asphalt and concrete replacement, and video surveillance installation.
  2. Major Maintenance: roofing, playground replacement, plumbing, storage, and flooring replacement. Widen walking paths.
  3. Modernization: upgrade HVAC, remove portables, build new multi-use room.

Golden West

Golden West had a needs estimate of $12.4 million in the Master Facilities Plan. From Measure G, $12.7 million was spent. From Prop 39 funds, another $640,000 was spent. This left only $500,000 in unfunded projects remaining.

  1. Health and Safety: asphalt replacement, flood control drainage, and fire alarms.
  2. Major Maintenance: playground replacement, plumbing, storage, and flooring replacement. Fix curbing in play areas.
  3. Modernization: upgrade HVAC, structural repairs, remove portables, expand parking lot, build new cafeteria, add student share area, and add cement in student amphitheater.

Sequoia

Sequoia had a needs estimate of $7.5 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Those identifed projects needed $8.6 million from Measure G for completion. From Prop 39, another $550,000 helped complete related projects, leaving $2 million in needed projects that were left unfunded at the project's conclusion.

  1. Health and Safety: asphalt replacement, fire alarms, and Video Surveillance.
  2. Major Maintenance: concrete replacement, roofing, flooring, update cafeteria and remove portables.
  3. Modernization: upgrade HVAC, remove portables and add permanent classrooms, re-orient front of campus for greater safety and access.

Lathrop Elementary

Lathrop Elementary had a needs estimate of $14.2 million in the Master Facilities Plan. From Measure G, $14.6 million was spent and another $5.3 million in needed projects were left unfunded.

  1. Health and Safety: asphalt and concrete replacement, portable replacement, fire alarms, and video surveillance.
  2. Major Maintenance: roofing, HVAC and energy updates, flooring, renovate kitchen and landscaping.
  3. Modernization: windows, parking lot expansion, remodel courtyard and staff lounge, and create a new storage building.

Shasta

Shasta had a needs estimate of $8.4 million in the Master Facilities Plan. That $8.4 million was spent from Measure G and another $570,000 from Prop 39 for qualifying projects. This left Shasta with $1.6 million in needed projects were left unfunded.

    1. Health and Safety: asphalt replacement, flood control drainage, and video surveillance.
    2. Major Maintenance: Bell/PA system, roofing, plumbing, curbing, irrigation, replace portables.
    3. Modernization: HVAC, parking area improvements.

Phase 2: 2018-2020

Phase 2: 2018-2020

Phase 2: 2017-2020

Following phase one, MUSD immediately began reaching out for public voice regarding phase two. This included public round table meetings at Manteca HS and East Union HS to ensure that public priorities were heard.

The Operations Department schedules internal employees to perform much of the ongoing maintenance work using a Routine Restricted Maintenance fund to avoid costs that would be incurred from a third party contractor.

Using this fund, MUSD leadership will be able to prioritize which school projects can be completed in house. Because this fund is limited, many unfunded projects will not be completed.

Manteca High School

Manteca HS has a needs estimate of $30 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Of that amount, $15 million is allocated from Measure G and it is anticipated that $25 million of growth funds will help offset the $15 million in unfunded projects at this campus.

MHS Murals

MHS Murals

MHS Murals

  1. Health and Safety: backup generator & Fire Alarms, Theater safety remodel, and widen walkways.
  2. Major Maintenance: asphalt repair, electrical and plumbing repair, permanent building and portable repair.
  3. Modernization: remove and replace portables, Vocation Education shop, New Winter Gym.

East Union High School

East Union HS has a needs estimate of $39.8 million in the Master Facilities Plan. From Measure G, $13 million will be spent. From Prop 39, Nutrition and IT funds, another $2.3 million will be spent. This leaves $23 million in unfunded projects remaining. A small portion of this will be offset by a technology grant.

  1. Health and Safety: backup generator, fire alarms,portable removal, concrete replacement and video surveillance.
  2. Major Maintenance: roofing, major structural repair, HVAC and PA system upgrades, flooring replacement, Ag and Science lab upgrades.
  3. Modernization: lighting upgrades, field improvements, locker room remodel, parking lot expansion, new construction of Admin, Ag, classrooms, and theater.

Nile Garden

Nile Garden has a needs estimate of $13.5 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Those identified projects will receive $7.2 million from Measure G for completion. From Prop 39 and Nutrition Ed, another $0.7 million will help complete related projects, this leaves $5.6 million in unfunded but needed projects. Fortunately, due to large growth in the Nile Garden area, it is anticipated that an additional $7 million in growth dollars will be funded.

Nile Garden

Nile Garden

Nile Garden

  1. Health and Safety: asphalt replacement, fire alarm and flood control drainage.
  2. Major Maintenance: fix dry rot, rood replacement, bathroom and kitchen renovation, flooring, remove and replace portables.
  3. Modernization: convert classroom into office, remodel jr. high science, stage refinished, cafeteria enlarged into multi-purpose room.

Neil Hafley

Neil Hafley has a needs estimate of $5.5 million in the Master Facilities Plan. From Measure G, $4.1 million will be spent. Also, another $0.4 million from Fund 35 and IT will help with authorized projects. This leaves and another $1.2 million in needed projects left unfunded.

Neil Hafley

Neil Hafley

Neil Hafley

  1. Health and Safety: fix video surveillance and replace student gardens.
  2. Major Maintenance: convert play area into student eating area, pavement improvements, irrigation improvements, flooring, plumbing, curbing, landscaping and field improvements.
  3. Modernization: replace playground, remove and replace portable classrooms.

New Haven

New Haven has a needs estimate of $12.6 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Of that, $6.1 million will be spent from Measure G and another $150,000 from IT for qualifying projects. This leaves New Haven with $5.9 million in needed projects left unfunded.

    1. Health and Safety: asphalt replacement, fire alarms, flood control renovate kinder bathrooms, replace portables with permanent classrooms.
    2. Major Maintenance: replace playground, roofing, other structural repairs, flooring and kitchen renovation, curbing, trees and field improvement, and replace portables.
    3. Modernization: replace playground, new construction of multi-use room.

George McParland

George McParland has a needs estimate of $13 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Of that amount, $8.5 million will be spent from Measure G and another $1.2 from Prop 39 and IT for qualifying projects. This leaves McParland with $3.4 million in needed projects left unfunded.

  1. Health and Safety: asphalt repair, video surveillance and fire alarms, replace student gardens.
  2. Major Maintenance: new bell & intercom system, lighting upgrades, renovate kitchen, flooring and plumbing, fencing changes.
  3. Modernization: replace playground, upgrade HVAC, landscaping and field improvements, remove portables, new multi-use room and pavement improvements.

French Camp

As the oldest school in the district, French Camp has a needs estimate of $23.1 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Only $7 million is funded to be spent from Measure G and another $0.9 million from Fund 35 and IT for qualifying projects. This leaves French Camp with a major $15.85 million in needed projects left unfunded.

  1. Health and Safety: video surveillance.
  2. Major Maintenance: roof replacement, HVAC, flooring, plumbing, fencing removal, and replace portables.
  3. Modernization: energy upgrades, HVAC, field improvement, parking lot expansion, portable replacement, new classroom construction, and a shade structure.

Phase 3: 2020-2023

Phase 3: 2020-2023

Phase 3: 2020-2023

Following phase 2, MUSD will continue to reach out for public voice regarding school needs. This will be particularly important in regards to Sierra HS.

The Operations Department schedules internal employees to perform much of the ongoing maintenance work using a Routine Restricted Maintenance fund to avoid costs that would be incurred from a third party contractor.

Using this fund, MUSD leadership will be able to prioritize which school projects can be completed in house. Because this fund is limited, many unfunded projects will not be completed.

Sierra High School

Sierra HS has a needs estimate of $31.4 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Of that amount, $11.9 million is allocated from Measure G and it is anticipated that $600,000 of Nutrition and IT funds for those specific projects will help. Regardless, this leaves significant $18.8 million in unfunded projects at this campus.

  1. Health and Safety: video surveillance, flood control, and concrete replacement.
  2. Major Maintenance: asphalt replacement, structural repairs, roof replacement, HVAC, painting and flooring, renovate kitchen, plumbing, field improvement, and landscaping.
  3. Modernization: field improvement, replace portables, new construction of theater and vocation education shop.

August Knodt

August Knodt has a needs estimate of $8.1 million in the Master Facilities Plan. From Measure G, $4.7 million will be spent. From Prop 39, Nutrition and IT funds, another $1.1 million will be spent. This leaves $2.2 million in unfunded projects remaining.

  1. Health and Safety: asphalt and concrete repair, video surveillance, flood control, field improvement and replace portables.
  2. Major Maintenance: repair roof and termite damage, HVAC, flooring, plumbing and landscaping.
  3. Modernization: replace playground, upgrade lighting, remove portables and upgrade cafeteria tables..

Brock Elliott

Brock Elliott has a needs estimate of $4.9 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Those identified projects will receive $4.4 million from Measure G for completion. From Nutrition Ed and IT, another $0.3 million will help complete related projects. This leaves $4.24 million in unfunded but needed projects.

  1. Health and Safety: asphalt and concrete repair, video surveillance, and replace portables.
  2. Major Maintenance: Bell PA system, painting and flooring, renovate kitchen, plumbing, curbing, fencing and trees.
  3. Modernization: replace playground, upgrade lighting and HVAC.

Joshua Cowell

Joshua Cowell has a needs estimate of $12.2 million in the Master Facilities Plan. From Measure G, $5.5 million will be spent. Also, another $0.96 million from Prop. 39, Nutrition and IT will help with authorized projects. This leaves and another $5.7 million in needed projects left unfunded.

  1. Health and Safety: asphalt repair, video surveillance, and fire alarms.
  2. Major Maintenance: replace playground, roof replacement, other structural repairs, painting and flooring, plumbing and landscaping.
  3. Modernization: lighting and HVAC, replace portables, new construction of multi-use room.

Stella Brockman

Stella Brockman has a needs estimate of $8.5 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Of that, $4.7 million will be spent from Measure G and another $1.2 million from Prop. 39, Nutrition and IT for qualifying projects. This leaves Sella Brockman with $2.6 million in needed projects left unfunded.

    1. Health and Safety: video surveillance, Bell PA system, field improvement and replace portables.
    2. Major Maintenance: concrete replacement, stage door, roof repair, HVAC and energy upgrade, flooring, plumbing, renovate kitchen and landscaping.
    3. Modernization: replace playground, energy upgrades on lighting.

Walter Woodward

Walter Woodward has a needs estimate of $2.8 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Of that amount, $0.5 million will be spent from Measure G and another $0.4 from Nutrition and IT for qualifying projects. This leaves $2 million in needed projects left unfunded.

  1. Health and Safety: video surveillance, and replace restroom door.
  2. Major Maintenance: roof repair, flooring, renovate kitchen, plumbing, landscaping and field improvement, concrete replacement.
  3. Modernization: install shade structure.

Joseph Widmer

Joseph Widmer has a needs estimate of $5.2 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Of that need, $1.5 million is funded to be spent from Measure G and another $1.2 million from Prop. 39, Nutrition and IT for qualifying projects. This leaves $2.6 million in needed projects left unfunded.

  1. Health and Safety: replace playground, fire alarm and video surveillance.
  2. Major Maintenance: roof repair, structural repairs, flooring, plumbing, renovate kitchen, replace portables.
  3. Modernization: install shade structure, energy and HVAC, and parking lot expansion.

George Komure

George Komure has a needs estimate of $4.5 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Of that need, $2.3 million is funded to be spent from Measure G and another $0.35 million from Nutrition and IT for qualifying projects. This leaves George Komure with $1.8 million in needed projects left unfunded.

  1. Health and Safety: video surveillance.
  2. Major Maintenance: roof repair, renovate kitchen, flooring, plumbing, fencing, landscapign and field improvement.
  3. Modernization: fix playground bridge, fencing, replace portables, expand parking lot, refurbish marquee.

Great Valley

Great Valley has a needs estimate of $9.8 million in the Master Facilities Plan. Of that amount, $2.9 million is funded to be spent from Measure G and another $1.2 million from Prop. 39, Nutrition and IT for qualifying projects. This leaves $5.7 million in needed projects left unfunded.

  1. Health and Safety: rfire alarms, video surveillance, flood control and replace portables.
  2. Major Maintenance: roof repair, structural repairs, flooring, renovate kitchen, plumbing, landscaping and field improvement.
  3. Modernization: replace playground, Bell PA system, lighting and HVAC, parking lot expansion, remove portables and field improvement.

Additional School Projects

Several of our schools have not been closely aligned with Measure G due to limited funds. These projects are planned thoughout the phases. We are planning on addressing as many of these needs as we can through our routine restricted maintenance efforts, but many of these identified projects remain unfunded.

These largely unfunded projects include: Veritas, Mossdale, New Vision HS, Weston Ranch HS, be.tech HS, Manteca Day School, Lathrop HS and Calla HS.

Each of these schools have real needs that as you can see from the graphic at right, we are far short of meeting. These numbers are not included in the phase 3 summary graphic.

Phase 1

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 3

Phase Summary

Phase Summary

in today's dollars

In today's dollars

Phase 1

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 3

Phase Summary

Phase Summary

in today's dollars

In today's dollars

Financial Summary

Financial Summary

Financial Summary

Financial Summary

Total need 2014

Total need 2014

Unfunded New Construction 2014

Unfunded New Construction 2014

Unfunded New Construction 2023

Unfunded New Construction 2023

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Total need 2014

Total need 2014

Unfunded New Construction 2014

Unfunded New Construction 2014

Unfunded New Construction 2023

Unfunded New Construction 2023

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Road Ahead

Community

How Schools Connect

High Performing Schools for Every Neighborhood

When families, schools, and community institutions collectively agree upon their goals and decide how to reach them, everyone benefits.

Student Centered Positively Impacts the Community

Meaningful, measurable, and student-centered targets aligned to state mandates and standards equal high performing schools for every neighborhood.

Great schools bring hope and change to neighborhoods that drives local economic development.

Achievement

MUSD students are engaged. We have a 97% daily attendance rate.

MUSD students are improving. For example, in our ELA community, 55% of students in 4-8th grade are making significant progress toward proficiency. As students become well-educated, they become productive citizens and contributing community members.

The National Association of Realtors surveyed home buyers:

  • 22% listed a home's proximity to the school as part of the buying decision.
  • 29% of the buyers listed school quality as a deciding factor in their decision.
  • 91% included school boundaries in their decision making process.
  • No more kids in school? Property values near good schools increase regardless.

Great schools motivate students to fulfill their academic potential. This has a ripple effect on siblings, parents, and neighborhoods.

Do communities complement and reinforce the values, culture and learning the schools provide for their students? Or do they negate everything the schools strive to accomplish?

Communities either furnish crucial financial support systems, or the schools lack the resources they need.

How are we Connected to the Community?

Facility Use

We work closely with school sites as the liaison to our community groups. MUSD facilities have been shared with 55 facility users made up of local youth groups, the cities of Manteca, Lathrop, and Stockton, and other non-profit organizations.

Where do you go on a Friday night? Where are you on the weekend with your kids or grandkids? Where are your evenings spent during the week?

How often are you are you at a baseball, basketball, soccer or football game at a local school?

Beyond sports, how often are you at the high school participating in band, choir, drama, or some other community event?

Employment

MUSD offers local employment opportunity for many community residents. At present, there are 2,833 positions in MUSD—most of them full-time positions.

How does City Development Impact Schools?

We support NEW growth that is fiscally responsible.

This includes having positive relationships with developers who pay developer fees and join local CFD's. This also includes mitigated agreements and reimbursements for modernization projects from the state.

CFD's are crucial for schools as they are circular and not one-time payments. They allow us to leverage bonds on the market to grow in the future. Learn more about CFDs in Manteca Unified here.

CFD Overview

A small portion of these funds must also come from the general funds and in all likelihood there will be a need to seek a 2020 MUSD bond.

Why? Because we cannot fund these projects without all these contributors paying their share. If there is a missing chunk, there isn't enough money to do the project. We are 100% in support of fiscally responsible growth. It maintains your communities. It is a must to have a maintenance plan for that community and their schools.

How do Local Funds help?

  • Good repair and maintenance of our schools support students and organizations in the local community.
  • Modernization projects ensure safe student environments.
  • Build more classrooms for increasing student population.
  • Employ more educators and classified staff.

Construction Costs are NOT Static

It is also crucial to understand that construction costs are not static and continue to rise. According to independent economic researchers, "Since 1993, the 25-year long-term annual construction inflation for nonresidential buildings has averaged 3.5%, even when including the recessionary period 2007-2011.  The long-term average inflation is 4% for the 20 non-recessionary years during that period. During rapid growth period of 5 years from 2004-2008, inflation averaged 8% per year. Inflation is 4.2% per year for the last 4 years."

This helps explain how several schools in phase 1 needed greater funds to complete their projects in 2017 than was projected in 2014. Similarly, projects to be completed in 2023 could end up costing 136% of their original projection.

Growth in Manteca Unified

Davis Demographics & Planning, Inc. is assisting the Manteca Unified School District to plan for future student population changes. By factoring current and historical student data with demographic data and planned residential development, DDP calculated a Five year student population projection.

In addition to the five year projection DDP was also contracted to conduct a “build out” projection that takes into account all potential development to estimate the District’s resident student population at maturity or buildout. These projections are based upon residence of the students and are designed to alert the District as to when and where student population shifts will occur as well as assist the District in determining how best to add capacity.

The Manteca Unified School District is expected to continue to grow over the next five years. The bulk of the growth is expected to occur within the District’s K-8 student population.

Growth is also expected to occur in the District’s High School student population. The projected growth is attributed to: First, the amount of planned residential development expected to occur over the next 5 years and second, the growing size of incoming kindergarten classes expected to enter the District beginning as soon as 2018 due to increasing birth rates that date back to 2012.

To provide enough learning environments to solve this growth, the District has recently supplemented their overflow policy with a boundary adjustment. This solution may begin to become less effective in providing relief for impacted areas and require further adjustment as these same areas are the ones that are expected to see the most growth over the next 5 years.

At the high school level there is enough existing capacity to adequately house the District’s high school student population.

Determining how many facilities will be needed upon maturity is a function of how large the District would like to see its campuses; moving forward, District staff plans to work on making this determination.

MUSD Boundary Change Map

MUSD Boundary Change Map

MUSD Boundary Change Map

A Note on Boundaries

As you can see from the map above, we have made some boundary changes to some schools in the district.

To find out where your child is to attend school, please use our interactive "Find Your School" resource here.

There are several reasons Manteca USD is looking at attendance boundaries. Some areas of Manteca Unified School District (most specifically south of the SR 120 in Manteca and in the City of Lathrop) are growing rapidly while other areas have a shrinking population of school-aged children.

Rather than build more new schools than needed (at a cost of close to $35 million each), the District is dedicated to building strong neighborhood schools and maximizing the use of existing facilities.

The Growth Steering committee commissioned an on-going study to continuously evaluate our projected student enrollment. The study allowed us to create healthier school enrollment across the District now and into the next decade.

To learn more information about these boundary changes, and to read the complete Frequently Asked Questions document, please visit: http://www.mantecausd.net/boundary

The primary changes in boundaries affect Nile Garden, Veritas, Lincoln, and Walter Woodward schools. Current enrollment and projected enrollment have both been taken into account.

Also, every effort has been made to change these boundaries so that all students from a given school will attend the same high school together. For example, under this change, all students from Veritas will now attend Sierra High School whereas before, some of them attended Manteca High School.

To find out where your child is to attend school, please use our interactive "Find Your School" resource here.

Next Steps

Science students share their knowledge

Science students share their knowledge

Science students share their knowledge

This is a living plan that will be updated regularly. Because much of the information we have shared was based on the 2014 Master Facility Plan, we need to do the following to move forward with next steps.

  1. Continue Measure G Plan
  2. Update the Master Facility Plan
  3. Update the Educational Specifications
  4. Align Facility Capacity
  5. Align Program Capacity
  6. Align Projected Enrollment
  7. Align Existing Funding Streams
  8. Identify Other Funding Opportunties in Bond 2020
  9. Review, Evaluate, Refine

Download a copy of this report.